Myths Related To SEO On WordPress.Com Site

seo myth on WordPress site

If you are a diligent blogger striving hard to make a place in web blogging, naturally you will want to achieve SEO on WordPress.com. If your blog has achieved Search Engine Optimization (SEO), it means that sophisticated search engines like Google, Yahoo!, MSN will link your blog to a keyword when someone searches it on internet and will display it among the top 10 results. For e.g. your latest blog is on patriotism. Now if your blog has achieved SEO, it will be displayed among the top 10 results whenever anyone makes a search for the word ‘patriotism’. And thus your blog will be visited by users more frequently.

To achieve SEO, you need to increase your site’s SERP (Search Engine Result Page). You can accomplish this by:

Frequently updating your account and by publishing new and interesting content promoting your blog in a way that it reaches your target audience. People looking for information on a particular topic which your blog covers.

There are a number of ways and methods to increase your site’s SERP ranking. But unfortunately, there exist a lot of commonly-believed myths about SEO on WordPress.com which have nothing to do with reality. Let’s take a look at some of these myths and the true facts which negate these myths.

Myth No.1:

To achieve SEO, I require a plugin.

Fact:

Matt Cutts, who is the head of Google’s webspam team, claims that WordPress.com is self sufficient in SEO and the users of WordPress.com only need to take care of 10-20 percent of the mechanics of SEO. The themes on WordPress.com have been composed in a way that they automatically link with search engines. Their design and composition makes it easy for search engines like Googlebot and several other search engines, to link the content and make it appear in front of a user. So no, you don’t require a plugin to achieve SEO on WordPress.com.

Myth No.2:

Increased use of tags and categories in my blog post means a better chance for it to link with Google.

Fact:

Adding irrelevant tags and categories that have nothing to do with the content of your post, won’t result in an increased visibility for your site on Google. Matt Cutts says, that Google doesn’t blindly rely on categories and tags. It knows the context of your post from its content. Also, if a post is bombarded with TOO MANY categories and tags, it will result in its exclusion from Reader Topics pages. While adding categories and tags for your post, choose wisely and only add those tags that have the highest significance to a post. On a similar note, be more specific while adding tags. For e.g. add “nanotechnology” as a tag instead of “science”.

Myth No.3:

If I am making a post about say, green tea, I should refer to the keyword and related terminologies again and again, as much as I can. This will get my post a lot of green tea-related traffic. Also, I should create multiple identical sites about green tea to get maximum traffic.

Fact:

It is good practice to inculcate correct keywords in your post and titles, period. Howbeit, overdoing it by stuffing keywords will not do any good for your SERP ranking. Also, copied material is not appreciated by Google and having multiple identical sites will be detrimental for your search ranking. Make your content appealing for human eyes, and not only to get maximum linkage with search engines.

 

Thanks for Reading ! Happy A Nice day ahead 🙂 🙂

India’s IT industry Agrees It Faces Twin Challenges: Trump And…

it-industry-reutersDelegates attend the NASSCOM India Leadership Forum in Mumbai.

MUMBAI: Automation and the new U.S. administration were the big unknowns at the tech sector’s annual shindig this week, with machines threatening to take away thousands of jobs and concerns over possible visa rule changes in the key American market.

But senior executives from the $150 billion industry, which rose to prominence at the turn of the century by helping Western firms solve the “Y2K” bug, said companies with skilled English-speaking staff and low costs could not be written off yet.

The sector, led by Tata Consultancy Services, Infosys Ltd and Wipro Ltd, is lobbying hard as the new U.S. administration under President Donald Trump considers putting in place visa restrictions.

The administration may also raise salaries paid to H1-B visa holders, a move that could significantly increase costs for IT companies that are already facing pressure on margins.

The longer-term challenge and opportunity for the sector was automation, executives said, as global corporations from plane-makers to consumer firms bet on the use of machines to further cut costs and boost efficiency.

That threatens lower-end software services and outsourcing jobs in a sector which employs more than 3.5 million people.

Summing up the mood at the three-day NASSCOM leadership event in Mumbai ending on Friday, Malcolm Frank, Chief Strategy Officer at Cognizant which has most of its operations in India, spoke of “fear and optimism.”

Even top IT executives were “fearing the machines”, he said.

Some top executives, including Infosys’ Chief Operating Officer Pravin Rao, said that greater automation was expected to help engineers and developers shed repetitive jobs for more creative roles.

“Some part of the work we’ll be automating 100 percent, you don’t require people to do that kind of work,” Mr Rao told Reuters. “But there are always newer things, where we will be able to re-purpose employees who are released from those areas.”

MOVING UP FOOD CHAIN

With rapidly changing technology, Indian IT firms are emphasising the need for retraining their workforce, in many cases setting up experience centres and learning zones on their sprawling campuses.

Some companies are partnering with universities to design and fund education programmes, while staff members spoke of employers laying on training and webinars to help develop skills in automation and cloud computing.

“The threat from automation killing jobs is more than Trump’s anticipated visa rule changes,” a general manager-level employee at a top Indian IT firm said.

NASSCOM chairman and Tech Mahindra CEO C.P. Gurnani said technology would create new roles where “man will manage machines,” even if a fourth of Indian IT jobs were to be replaced by machines over the next four years.

Hiring patterns may also change, with unconventional, high-value graduates likely to be more attractive, to the possible detriment of hiring from India’s engineering colleges.

Infosys, which traditionally recruited only engineering graduates, is considering hiring people educated in liberal arts to add creative skills to its workforce, COO Rao said.

In a first, NASSCOM (National Association of Software and Services Companies), the leading Indian IT lobby group, delayed its initial growth forecast for fiscal 2017/18, citing market uncertainty.

NASSCOM officials said it had deferred its predictions by three months to give it time to gauge policy announcements in the United States which could make immigration rules tougher.

The industry body aims to announce a firmer growth forecast after the quarter to March when IT companies report annual earnings and give guidance for the next fiscal year.

“A certain level of … uncertainty will continue over the medium-term,” said NASSCOM President R. Chandrashekhar. “And businesses therefore have to take essential decisions on new technology in the face of a certain degree of uncertainty.”